Events

Tanaz Dhondy wins international award

Costin Roe Consulting design engineer and PhD candidate, Tanaz Dhondy, received an award for ‘Best Oral Presentation’ following the delivery of her preliminary research findings at the inaugural International Workshop on Coastal Reservoirs held in January 2018, at the University of Wollongong.

Tanaz Dhondy wins international award

Tanaz Dhondy received the oral presentation (research) award at the IACRR Workshop 2018.

Titled: Investigation of the chemical and physical properties of sea sand for the possible use in concrete for coastal infrastructure, Tanaz’s award-winning presentation summarised the preliminary findings of Stage 1 of her PhD research.

Tanaz described the invitation to speak at the International Workshop on Coastal Reservoirs as “an amazing opportunity”, and receiving the award for ‘Best Oral Presentation’ at the event “an honour”.

“Around the world, cities appear to be running out of water. But is it the water that is running out of the cities?” – IACRR

Tanaz Dhondy speaks at the IACRR Workshop 2018.

Tanaz Dhondy speaks at the IACRR Workshop 2018.

Hosted by the Centre for Coastal Reservoir Research (CCRR) at the University of Wollongong, the world’s first international workshop on coastal reservoirs (CR) was held in collaboration with the International Association for Coastal Reservoir Research (IACRR).

“Major cities around the world are actively pursuing coastal reservoirs as a sustainable solution to their water problems. CR is an innovative technology that can recover floodwater entering the sea without desalination,” said the IACRR in promoting the workshop, which invited water resources planners, researchers, engineers, and scientists to review and assess the feasibility of coastal reservoirs in securing universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water.

Sydney Airport Runway Run 2017

Tanaz Dhondy and Erica Thornton, Costin Roe Consulting engineers, got into the seasonal spirit of giving to participate in the 2017 Sydney Airport Runway Run to raise funds for Cure Cancer Australia.

Tanaz Dhondy

Tanaz Dhondy, Design Engineer, Costin Roe Consulting, achieving vertical take-off at the Sydney Airport Runway Run 2017.

This one-of-a-kind event provides a rare opportunity for athletes and fun-runners to sprint 500 metres down one of Sydney Airport’s operational runways and support a great cause at the same time.

Costin Roe Consulting covered the entry fees for the two enthusiastic runners in their Costin Roe Consulting race-livery to take part in the event, which was limited to 100 total participants.

Sydney Airport Runway Run

Tanaz Dhondy and Erica Thornton representing Costin Roe Consulting.

Sydney Airport Runway Run

Sydney Airport staff were on-hand to assist runners with on-ground navigation.

The more familiar sight on runways at Sydney Airport.

The more familiar sight on runways at Sydney Airport.

Sydney Observatory was the magnificent setting for numerous industry executives to gather and celebrate the career of Wayne E. Costin who retired in July 2017 after 28 years as managing director of Costin Roe Consulting and Strata Engineering Solutions.

The invitation-only cocktail party was attended by CRC/SES staff, colleagues and associates, and representatives from various companies and non-profit organisations that Wayne has been closely associated with over the years.

Wayne Costin’s farewell was held on 10 November 2017 at Sydney Observatory.

During a brief journey through some of the highlights of Wayne’s long career, and amusing anecdotes told by and about Wayne, special mention was made of Wayne’s long-standing support for the Strata Community Australia (SCA NSW) and Wheelchair Sports NSW.

Moving forward with Grant Roe and Mark Wilson

The new managing director of Costin Roe Consulting, Grant Roe, showcased some of the firm’s most recent achievements including the 2017 Award win for Excellence in Structural Engineering (completed 2016, Veolia Woodlawn MBT Facility); acknowledged the firm’s young achievers; and praised the strong sense of team spirit which continues to flourish as the firm expands in size and capability. Newly-appointed director, Mark Wilson, detailed a civil project (Horsley Drive Business Park) for which the firm received an honourable mention in 2017 awards for sustainable stormwater design. Altogether, while everyone was wishing Wayne well for the future, the firm demonstrated its strengths in civil and structural engineering, building and land remediation, and engineering technology.

SMH Half Marathon

Engineers from Costin Roe Consulting participated in the Sydney Morning Herald Half Marathon, Australia’s largest and most prestigious half-marathon event, to finish in a victory for personal achievement and the team’s chosen charity, the Fred Hollows Foundation.

Team CRC at SMH Half Marathon

Conditions were perfect for Team CRC runners as more than 12,000 competitors powered through central Sydney

The mild autumn weather in Sydney on Sunday 21 May 2017 delivered perfect conditions for more than 12,000 competitors to set out from 6:45am on the 21.1km course starting in Hyde Park and going through Walsh Bay, Barangaroo, Darling Harbour, and Pyrmont, before reversing to return via Circular Quay and the Royal Botanic Gardens for completion in Hyde Park.

From elite athletes to enthusiastic fun-runners

Rio Olympian Liam Adams won the men’s race in a time of 1:05:08, the third time he has taken out the race which this year was held for the 26th time. Two-time winner Cassie Fien took out the women’s race in 1:15:32.

Seven of the Costin Roe Consulting team members completed the entire 21.1km course. These athletic ‘die-hards’ in the team’s designer-style Costin Roe Consulting racewear were Angus McDougall, Paul McKay, Eden Bartolo, Tanaz Dhondy, Lachlan Walters, Josh Cadman, and also Grace Campbell (guest team member as the partner of Paul McKay).

Breaking the total distance into more manageable relay segments, Rockie Cabida completed 14km with relay partner Chris Valoudis covering 7km; John Holme ran 14km with relay partner Angus Hartney doing 7km, and Erica Thornton completed 7km with her dad running as her relay partner.

Sporting-related endeavours part of firm’s tradition and culture

Angus McDougall, Costin Roe Consulting

Angus McDougall, Costin Roe Consulting engineer, was “en pointe” during the SMH Half Marathon 2017

Costin Roe Consulting’s Annual Charity Golf Day became popular with many of the firm’s construction and property industry contacts over the last seven years, raising funds and awareness for Wheelchair Sports NSW. Today, the firm’s involvement in sporting-related charitable events is more diverse, reflecting the diversity of interests and abilities within its ranks.

“It was great to see such strong participation by our people in the SMH Half Marathon this year,” said Mark Wilson, director of Costin Roe Consulting. “Engineering is a demanding occupation and we support our people to reach for their personal best – not only in professional development and project performance but their all-round wellbeing and physical fitness.”

Costin Roe Consulting engineers at SMH Half Marathon 2017

Costin Roe Consulting engineers at SMH Half Marathon 2017

 

 

CAREERS

 

WorldCUR Qatar 2016 Tanaz Dhondy

Costin Roe Consulting has congratulated Tanaz Dhondy, engineer at the firm’s Sydney office, for being selected to present an engineering research paper at the World Congress on Undergraduate Research (WorldCUR), to be held this November in Qatar.

WorldCUR brings together many the world’s most outstanding undergraduates to present research papers on important themes such as climate change, environment and sustainability, global health, science, society, urban and rural development, and information technology.

Tanaz Dhondy

Tanaz Dhondy, engineer at Costin Roe Consulting’s Sydney office.

“This is a fantastic achievement for Tanaz to receive this invitation to present her undergraduate research paper in Qatar in November,” said Wayne Costin, the founder of Costin Roe Consulting. “Our firm has a long tradition of attracting the brightest engineering students and offering them the opportunity to develop as engineers through the mentorship of people like Phil Terrey, our associate director, who is also a research fellow and tutor at the University of New South Wales.”

The paper to be presented at WorldCUR by Tanaz Dhondy will reveal the results of her research into steel-reinforced concrete, as commonly used in Australia but vulnerable to the effects of oxidation (“concrete cancer”), compared to concrete reinforced by non-rusting polymer bars, which can be used in America and Canada but not yet in Australia.

COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN THE MOMENT CAPACITY AND CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF GFRP REINFORCED CONCRETE AND STEEL REINFORCED CONCRETE

Abstract as follows:

Reinforced concrete is widely used in infrastructure worldwide. The use of steel reinforcement in concrete has gained acceptance due to its trusted durability over the centuries. Thus, countries have accepted steel as their primary reinforcement when designing and consulting infrastructure. However, even though steel reinforcement is accepted worldwide it comes with an array of problems which restrict its application or places constraints on its design. The main detrimental effect of steel reinforcement in concrete structures is the oxidation that occurs when steel is exposed to oxygen and water. This causes rusting of the steel rebars, which is commonly referred to as concrete cancer. Concrete cancer can affect the structural integrity of the infrastructure on which it is present, thus reducing its service life. Considering the worst case scenario, concrete cancer can lead to the undue collapse of the structure, which could cause harm to individuals in or around of the structure at the time of collapse. An innovative alternative to avoiding the effects of concrete cancer in reinforced concrete structures is the use of Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) reinforcement bars. The use of FRP reinforcement is not as commonly accepted, with guidelines and standards for design only being published by Canada (ISIS) and America (ACI). FRP has the mechanical characteristic of being brittle, while steel is ductile. The ductility in steel gives designers the confidence that the structure will yield prior to failure. While, in brittle material there is no sign or failure, due to the rapid rate of crack propagation. This research investigated and comparing the theoretical moment capacity and the corresponding cross-sectional area of reinforcement used for steel reinforced concrete section, using the Australian Standards, and with FRP reinforced concrete section, calculated using the American and Canadian standards.

Ms Tanaz Dhondy / Dr Alex Remennikov Faculty of Engineering, Information and Science University of Wollongong

WorldCUR 2016 Qatar

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